Hidden Art

Creativity & the Commonplace

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thegetty:

It’s only temporary!

We’re saying “see you later” to Modern Rome as it travels abroad to reunite with its sibling paintings at the first major retrospective of Turner’s late work.

#LateTurner

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instagram:

Step Inside London’s Felt Cornershop

To view more photos and videos from Lucy’s Cornershop, explore the The Cornershop location page, browse the #thecornershop hashtag and follow @sewyoursoul on Instagram.

Look closely at a corner shop in East London and you’ll see everything is not as it seems. The Cornershop, opened in a derelict store in Bethnal Green by artist Lucy Sparrow (@sewyoursoul), is actually an art installation which consists of 4,000 items all handmade from felt! From Heinz Baked Beans to Digestive Biscuits, everything in the shop is hand-stitched and the whole shop took Lucy eight months to assemble.

“I wanted to create something that surrounded people completely,” says Lucy, whose first job was in her local corner shop. “I hope this project reminds people just how much the cornershop cements life in local communities.” The installation runs until August 31.

(via etsy)

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And that brings up the macho performance of busyness. Often, when I mention trying to work less, people will tell me that they work 50 or 60 hours a week, and that they couldn’t possibly cut back to 40. There is a oneupsmanship with working in our culture, and the sheer number of hours is some kind of winning hand. But that raises the question of whether they are really working for all those hours. Or, to put it another way: would they have produced more if they had worked less, or worked better for the hours they worked?
Trish Roberts-Miller, 9 to 5 (Inside Higher Ed, Aug. 25th, 2014). (via millinerd)

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foodnetwork:


Recipe of the Day: Ina’s Summer Pasta with Tomatoes and Basil
Consider this summer on a plate. Ina’s top-rated pasta features a simple tomato-garlic sauce and a blanket of seasonal basil.

foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: Ina’s Summer Pasta with Tomatoes and Basil

Consider this summer on a plate. Ina’s top-rated pasta features a simple tomato-garlic sauce and a blanket of seasonal basil.

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In the beginning was beauty, and beauty was with God, and beauty was God. If the tradition of divine names, which (in its Christian form) originates with Dionysius the Areopagite and includes among its ranks Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, and others, is correct in identifying God with the name beauty, then repurposing the prologue to John’s Gospel in this way seems hardly controversial. For if beauty is a divine name then not only is it fitting to say God is beautiful, but it is equally fitting to say that God is beauty itself…

[And yet] the Christ who makes the created things in the world become doorways, as it were, into divine things is the sine qua non for identifying God as beauty itself.

Brendan Thomas Sammon, The God Who Is Beauty: Beauty as a Divine Name in Thomas Aquinas and Dionysius the Areopagite (Princeton Theological Monograph Series, 2013), 1 & 203. (via millinerd)

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Sure, we may now be a nation of cohabiting, contraception-using, homosexuality-supporting, pot smokers, but we’ve also become a nation that’s infinitely less bigoted and misogynist.

The Virtues of Libertines. Important message for Elizabeth Nolan Brown: changing the targets of your bigotry doesn’t make you “infinitely less bigoted” — in fact, it doesn’t make you less bigoted at all.

And less misogynist? That’s not what many, many women who write online tell us.

(via ayjay)

(via ayjay)

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thegetty:

The idealized countryside painted by a native city dweller.

This light and color study wasn’t meant for exhibition, but rather was a way for Corot to explore his new scenery outside of the studio. 

Houses near Orleans, about 1830, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. J. Paul Getty Museum.