Hidden Art

Creativity & the Commonplace

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“Children need to read, play, think, and ask questions, and in the process, form an active and eager imagination in which they process the questions and meaning of life. They need to escape to a pretend world in order to come back to reality with a more tangible understanding of the good and evil, the nature of man, and what it means to live the good life. Of course, they will not realize that they are learning these things, but they are, nonetheless. C.S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia, Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie, Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables, J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, Ralph Moody’s Little Britches, and so many other children’s books cause young and old minds alike to abandon their own afflictions and imagine a different time and place in order to deepen their understanding of the true, the good, and the beautiful.”

Filed under http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2010/08/let-little-children-come-to-me-childs.html

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Fairy tales show real life issues in a fantastical scenario where most often the hero triumphs…Children need to discover in a safe environment that bad things happen to everyone. Because guess what? No one in life is immune from challenges — so we need to build capacity in our children. Do we build emotional muscles so our children can hang on during tough times or do we shelter our kids, protecting them, leaving them so weak they can’t handle anything requiring strength?

Filed under http://imaginationsoup.net/2012/02/fairy-tales-are-essential-to-childhoohttp://imaginationsoup.net/2012/02/fairy-tales-are-essential-to-chil

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Review of Lila

Robinson’s grace is all the things we don’t have names for: the immortal souls we may or may not have, a doll with rag limbs loved to tatters. It’s sweet wild berries eaten in a field after a man baptizes the woman he will someday marry. Grace is money for a boy who may have killed his father; it’s one wife restoring the roses on the grave of another. Grace here isn’t a refutation of loss but a way of granting sorrow and joy their respective deeds of title. It offers itself to the doomed and the blessed among us, which is to say all of us. “Pity us, yes, but we are brave,” Lila realizes, “and wild, more life in us than we can bear, the fire infolding itself in us.”

Filed under http://m.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/10/the-power-of-grace/379334/

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foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: Tyler’s Sunday Pot Roast An all-in-one dinner that delivers impressive results every time, Tyler’s tried-and-true roast is made in just one pot in the oven.

foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: Tyler’s Sunday Pot Roast

An all-in-one dinner that delivers impressive results every time, Tyler’s tried-and-true roast is made in just one pot in the oven.

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foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: Giada’s Cheesy Pasta with Butternut Squash The creamy sauce for this fall-inspired pasta comes together as the heat of the penne melts tangy goat cheese.

foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: Giada’s Cheesy Pasta with Butternut Squash

The creamy sauce for this fall-inspired pasta comes together as the heat of the penne melts tangy goat cheese.

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Basic Cauliflower Rice Recipe:

Recipe Type: CauliflowerVegetablesDiet

Yields: 4 servings
Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 6 min

Ingredients:

1 head cauliflower
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil or safflower oil
1 medium onion, diced
Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper to taste
Spices, herbs, and/or vegetables of your choice (see variation ideas below)*

* Season as you would any rice dish. I added some diced red bell pepper and sautéed with the onions.

Preparation:

Wash, remove core and leaves, trim, and coarsely chop the cauliflower. Also make sure there are no brown or black spots on it. If so, remove with a paring knife. Chop the fresh cauliflower into small florets or pieces small enough to fit into the food processor. Make sure that the cauliflower pieces are completely dried before using.

In a large frying pan over medium heat, heat olive oil. Add onion and sauté approximately 10 minutes or until soft. If adding other diced vegetables, add with the onions.

Meanwhile, place cauliflower pieces in a food processor and process (pulse) until the cauliflower is small and has the texture of rice. Place florets in bowl of food processor in batches. Process until evenly chopped but not completely pulverized. Don’t over process, as the cauliflower can get mushy - you want a rough chop.

Raise the heat to medium-high. Add the prepared cauliflower to the cooked onions in the frying pan. Cover and cook approximately 5 to 6 minutes, stirring frequently, until the cauliflower is slightly crispy on the outside but tender on the inside (similar to “al dente” pasta). Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Remove from heat and serve.

Makes 4 servings.

Variation Ideas:

Also great used as “rice” in soups and stews and as side dish in place of rice or curry. Great served with chicken, seafood, and a side salad. Be creative!

  • Curried Cauliflower Rice:  Add 1 tablespoon turmeric or curry powder.
  • Herbed Rice: Add 1/4 cup of fresh basil, parsley, cilantro, green onion, and/or other herbs of your choice.
  • Chinese Fried Rice: After frying the cauliflower rice, push the cauliflower to one side of the pan. Pour in one (1) beaten egg into the empty part of the pan and lightly scramble the egg. Then mix the scrambled egg and cauliflower “rice” together. If desired, add a little soy sauce to the mixture.
  • Rice Salad: After frying and cooling, mix in some chopped cucumbers and tomatoes. Season lightly with some oil and vinegar.
  • Spanish Rice: After cooking the cauliflower, add an 8-ounce can of chopped tomatoes and a little hot sauce (to taste). Can also add some sautéed diced green pepper and garlic.
  • Vegetable Rice: Add your favorite diced vegetable; sauté with the onions.
  • Lemon Rice: Add some lemon zest and lemon juice.